Part Two of A Review of Trafalgar Editions’ Game of Nelson’s Epic Battle

by Paul Comben,  Designer:Crisanto Lorente Gonzalez,  Publisher: Trafalgar Editions

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Trafalgar has a range of advanced and optional rules designed to add a higher level of detail to the process of an engagement in the Age of Sail.  Not quite all of these are relevant to restaging the famous battle of October 21st 1805.  In that context, to give the obvious example, the rules for shore batteries belong to other designer scenarios, or to what players may create for themselves.

What I want to do here, rather than progressing through the pages of the game’s rulebook saying “you can now add this or should be using that,” I will look at additional procedures where there is a significant change to proceedings compared to the relatively simple “move and fight” nature of the basic rules.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Designer: Richard J. Kane Sr. and J. Michael Ruttle

Publisher: Clash of Arms Games

by Harvey Mossman

I doubt there is a respectable wargamer who hasn’t thought what it would be like to wear the uniform and march proudly in the ranks of the Grande Armee, following your esteemed general, Napoleon Bonaparte into glorious battle?  Well now Legion of Honor,  the eagerly awaited game from Clash of Arms, allows you to don your shako and live the life of a Napoleonic Grognard.    Where else can you re-create “the life and times of a soldier in the Army of France under the Republican Empire of Napoleon with each player assuming the role of a young Grognard of boundless ambition but meager means.”  The game tries to capture an era when war still had an extraordinary yet brutal pageantry, where the individual soldier still believed in Glory, Honor and the chance to gain Notice from their beloved general.

by Harvey Mossman

Flight of the Eagle boxThe Flight of the Eagle is a set of rules that harkens back to early days of war gaming when Kreigspiel was done with generals positioned around large maps, pushing little flags or wooden blocks representing the maneuver elements of their army.  Umpires would oversee the progress of the campaign and use complex procedures to adjudicate the results of battles.  The commanders’ performances would thus be evaluated and a debriefing would follow to determine what went right and what went wrong in the campaign.  Designer Didier Rouy and Pratzen Editions have taken this concept and applied it to the Napoleonic era.  Using paper, pen, six sided dice and copies of 19th century maps, they have constructed a rule set whereby teams of players can fight almost any of the Napoleonic campaigns from 1805 to 1815 in an umpired setting.