Strategies for Scenario #1 in Victory Games’ Gulf Strike Board Game

Gulf Strike Board Game

Overview

Long before Saddam Hussein and the Iraqi army brought the horrors of war to the kingdom of Kuwait, there was a company called Victory Games and a designer named Mark Herman who postulated that it would likely be Iran who would incite a major war in the Persian Gulf region. Work was begun on a simulation that culminated in Gulf Strike, a board game that addressed a series of potential conflict scenarios in the Persian Gulf, from an Iranian invasion of the Gulf States (US siding with the Gulf States) to a Soviet invasion of Iran (US assisting the Iranian defense).

Discussion of South Vietnamese Politics in Victory Games

Vietnam: 1965-1975

Vietnam Board Game Review


Overview

Besides providing a thoroughly engaging operational and grand operational war game experience, Victory Games’ definitive Vietnam War board game, Vietnam: 1965-1975, also exposes a political dimension. In addition to having responsibility for all tactical and operational decisions, the US/ARVN player must make decisions that I believe would be considered above a theater commander’s pay grade.

House Rules for Victory Games Cold War

  • Degrading Political Alliance – The rules are unclear about this, so the question arose as to whether or not you may, after establishing an Alliance and gaining Economic Control, then degrade the Alliance and still retain Economic Control. This is an important issue since the number of political markers (Faction, Alliance and Political Control) are limited by design. Using this technique would free up an Alliance marker for use elsewhere while still maintaining Economic Control. Our house rule allows this, because the game rules state that you must have an Alliance (or better) to establish Economic Control, but it does not say anywhere that you must maintain that Alliance in order to keep the Economic Control intact.

Vietnam: 1965-1975 Search & Destroy

Search & Destroy Operations in Vietnam: 1965-1975

Based on conversations with fellow gamers, I think that Victory Games 1980s title Vietnam: 1965-1975 has gotten miscategorized as an ultra-complex war game. Whenever I would suggest it to the group, I’d get the same eye-rolling reaction, “Uhhhhhhh-ohhhhhhhh…. not that game.”. While it’s true that the game has many, many moving parts, the heart and soul of the operational component, the Search & Destroy operation, is not terribly complex.

This “How-To” article will take you on a guided tour of a typical American Search & Destroy operation.